FACTBOX-The United Nations mission in DR Congo

Fri May 14, 2010 4:20pm GMT
 

May 14 (Reuters) - Rebel insurgencies continue in Democratic Republic of Congo, a former Belgian colony, despite years of U.N.-backed operations, and violence has displaced 1.4 million people in the eastern Kivu provinces.

Here are some facts about the mission known as MONUC, the largest of its kind in the world.

-- The United Nations started a peacekeeping mission in 1999 during a 1998-2003 war that drew in more than six African countries and killed as many as 5.4 million people.

-- U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's April 5 report to the Security Council said President Joseph Kabila had asked the U.N. to submit a proposal by June -- the 50th anniversary of the country's independence from Belgium -- for withdrawing MONUC in 2011. Ban Ki-moon has recommended the Council extends the mandate for a further year from June 1, 2010.

-- The current strength of the force is 20,573 in uniformed personnel - this includes 18,645 troops, 712 military observers, 1,216 police, 1,001 international civilian personnel 2,690 local civilian staff and 629 United Nations Volunteers.

* Countries to have supplied military personnel are: Bangladesh, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, France, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Yemen and Zambia.

-- The United Nations has lost 98 troops in the operation with a further 10 military observers and six police killed. 30 local civilian and 12 international civilian members of MONUC have also died, bringing the official death toll to 156.

Source: monuc.unmissions.org/

 
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