Newest technologies becoming weapons in fight for land rights

Mon Mar 20, 2017 9:20pm GMT
 

By Paola Totaro

WASHINGTON, March 20 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - C utting-edge technologies – from drones to data collected by taxi drivers - are becoming key weapons in the global battle to improve land rights and fight poverty, experts said on Monday.

Advances in earth observation, digital connectivity and computing power provide an array of information, from detailed topographical maps to transportation use, that was previously unimaginable, geospatial experts said at a World Bank Conference on Land and Poverty.

The information collected can be instrumental to helping establish property records and land titling systems in countries where there is no formal ownership or land-use documentation.

Survey-mapping drones may look like toys but are powerful machines having a huge impact on land-use planning in Africa, said Edward Anderson, a senior World Bank disaster management expert.

High-quality, high-resolution images taken by drones in Zanzibar identified nearly 2,000 new buildings in one 12-month period alone, he said.

The mapping exercise, budgeted at $2 million in 2005, was completed at a tenth of the price by local university students operating the small, light, unmanned drones, he said.

"Coastal zones are developing and urbanizing so quickly, waterside areas are being developed into hotels, residential properties," he said.

"Until now, there was no way of quantifying this change and making comparisons," he said.   Continued...

 
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