Assad: Syria won't stop fight against "terrorists"

Tue Aug 9, 2011 7:22pm GMT
 

By Khaled Yacoub Oweis

AMMAN (Reuters) - Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said on Tuesday his forces would continue to pursue "terrorist groups" after Turkey pressed him to end a military assault aimed at crushing protests against his rule.

Syria "will not relent in pursuing the terrorist groups in order to protect the stability of the country and the security of the citizens," state news agency SANA quoted Assad as telling Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu.

"But (Syria) is also determined to continue reforms ... and is open to any help offered by friendly and brotherly states."

While the two men held talks in Damascus, Syrian forces killed at least 30 people and moved into a town near the Turkish border, an activist group said.

The National Organisation for Human Rights said most of the fatalities occurred when troops backed by tanks and armoured vehicles overran villages north of Hama, while four were killed in Binnish, 30 km (20 miles) from the border with Turkey.

Washington expressed disappointment at Assad's latest comments and said U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expected to talk to Davutoglu after his meetings in Syria.

"It is deeply regrettable that President Assad does not seem to be hearing the increasingly loud voice of the international community," U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told reporters when asked about the comment.

She refused to comment directly on a 2009 U.S. diplomatic cable quoted by McClatchy newspapers last week describing Assad in unflattering terms, calling him "neither as shrewd nor as long-winded as his father" (former president Hafez al-Assad).   Continued...

Syria's President Bashar al-Assad (L) meets with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu in Damascus August 9, 2011. REUTERS/Turkish Foreign Ministry/Hakan Goktepe/Handout
 
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