Olympics-Two men in a boat bridge South Africa race gap

Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:59am GMT
 

By Jon Herskovitz

JOHANNESBURG, June 15 (Reuters) - One is white and the offspring of a South African yachting great. The other is black and hails from a shantytown set up by the defunct apartheid regime as a ghetto.

Together, Roger Hudson and Asenathi Jim are the South African entry for the two-man 470 sailing event at the London Olympics. They see themselves as symbols of the multi-racial country former President Nelson Mandela was trying to forge.

"We are going to be a light in South Africa - a good combination in and out of the water," Jim told Reuters.

The two are long shots for medals, having only been together for about 18 months in an event where the world's top pairs have usually been sailing partners for at least a decade.

The two are the unlikeliest of shipmates.

Hudson, now in his early 30s, grew up in the world of sailing, long associated with affluence. Jim, 20, comes from the Red Hill township overlooking the waters near Cape Town, a place whose streets of broken asphalt are a world away from the pristine yacht clubs dotting the coast.

As a teen, Jim joined the Izivungu Sailing School, aimed at building self-esteem and sailing skills among the legions of poor black youth whose lives have improved little since white-minority apartheid rule ended in 1994.

Jim, who goes by the nickname "squirrel", took to the water like a duck, moving into the crew assembled by RaceAhead, set up by Roger Hudson and his father David Hudson, who represented South Africa at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and managed the country's team at the 1996 Atlanta Games.   Continued...

 
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